Dorothy Gillespie: Courage, Independence and Color

One of the great abstract expressionists of the 20th century, Dorothy Gillespie challenged society and women’s place in it through her activism, teaching and groundbreaking artwork. Hear the story of this creative trailblazer in a special documentary screening in Alexis & Jim Pugh Theater.

Bucking the expectations of her racially segregated small town and God-fearing parents, Dorothy left her home of Roanoke, Virginia to study art at the Maryland Institute (MICA), eventually making her way to New York City where she spent her twenties painting in the bohemian West Village among the artistic luminaries of the 1940s and 1950s.

Today, Dorothy is remembered as a major figure in the abstract expressionist art movement and an ardent advocate for equal representation for women artists. From her first show at the Cherry Lane Theatre, to her groundbreaking use of aluminum, Dorothy’s creations continue to inspire millions of Americans. To this day, her large murals and towering, metal sculptures grace public spaces in cities like New York, Roanoke, and Orlando. This film follows Dorothy on her journey, in what can only be described as a life exemplified by courage, independence and color.

Presented By:
Dr. Phillips Center for the Performing Arts
Dates:
May 5, 2024
Price:
Tickets from $20
Time:
2 p.m.

One of the great abstract expressionists of the 20th century, Dorothy Gillespie challenged society and women’s place in it through her activism, teaching and groundbreaking artwork. Hear the story of this creative trailblazer in a special documentary screening in Alexis & Jim Pugh Theater.

Bucking the expectations of her racially segregated small town and God-fearing parents, Dorothy left her home of Roanoke, Virginia to study art at the Maryland Institute (MICA), eventually making her way to New York City where she spent her twenties painting in the bohemian West Village among the artistic luminaries of the 1940s and 1950s.

Today, Dorothy is remembered as a major figure in the abstract expressionist art movement and an ardent advocate for equal representation for women artists. From her first show at the Cherry Lane Theatre, to her groundbreaking use of aluminum, Dorothy’s creations continue to inspire millions of Americans. To this day, her large murals and towering, metal sculptures grace public spaces in cities like New York, Roanoke, and Orlando. This film follows Dorothy on her journey, in what can only be described as a life exemplified by courage, independence and color.